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Advertisment Security for your handgun is paramount, and outside of a bigger safe for all your firearms, a biometric safe can often be the best choice for someone looking to secure their favorite sidearm.   There are many types of smaller safes, but biometric gun safes with fingerprint recognition have become increasingly popular in recent years. Biometric safes do away with the mechanical codes of traditional safes.

Best Biometric Gun Safes with Fingerprint Recognition

Best Biometric Gun Safes with Fingerprint RecognitionAdvertisment Security for your handgun is paramount, and outside of a bigger safe for all your firearms, a biometric safe can often be the best choice for someone looking to secure their favorite sidearm.  There are many types of smaller safes, but biometric gun safes with fingerprint recognition have become increasingly popular in recent years. Biometric safes do away with the mechanical codes of traditional safes. Instead, they rely on the owner’s biometric data (your fingerprint), to provide quick access when needed. This article will examine the key features to consider when buying a biometric safe for your pistol, followed by a complete breakdown of eight of the best that are currently available on today’s market. Contents Biometric Gun Safe Basics Buyer’s Guide 1. Reliability 2. Bolted vs Unbolted 3. Shape and Size 4. Alternative Access 5. Certifications 6. Manufacturing Materials Our Eight Favorites 1. SentrySafe Pistol Safe 2. Gunvault SpeedVault SVB500 3. Viking Security Safe VS-25BL 4. VAULTEK VT20i Handgun Safe 5. Barska Biometric with Fingerprint Lock 6. Barska Top Opening Safe 7. The GunBox 2.0 Pistol Safe 8. Barska Compact Security Safe Parting Shots Biometric "Gun Safe Basics" Biometric gun safes use the body’s own information as the means of accessing the safe. As such, they do not usually feature mechanical locks that would require the entry of a code, or turning a dial.  Some models do have the ability to use a key, or a code – but it’s not the only means of opening the safe.  This makes it so that owners don’t have to worry about remembering combinations, as their fingerprints contain all of the information needed to access the safe. Fingerprint recognition allows the owner to register their fingerprints at the time of installation. Some models can register several fingerprints if multiple people need access to the safe. The safe will check the fingerprints of anybody who attempts to access the safe against the registered fingerprint. They are great in panic situations, where you don’t have the ability to remember a combination or find a key when reaching for your handgun.  If you try to open the safe with a non registered fingerprint, most models create an alert status that the safe’s owner must disengage with his or her own fingerprint. Poorly-made scanners may fail to spot registered fingerprints, resulting in the owner losing access to the safe. Many scanners will also struggle to identify fingerprints from soiled fingers, or any fingers that have paper cuts. That means it’s vital to research overall quality before making a purchase.  Battery operated scanners are popular, but most safes that are powered by a battery also have key opening access in the event of a battery failure. Buyer’s Guide There are many quality points to consider when buying a fingerprint recognition style safe. Most biometric gun safes offer similar security features.  Lock it up, use your finger when you want to open it and then walk away.  With that being said, there are also definitely different technologies that are used with each manufacturer. Before making a purchase, we’ve identified 10 different quality checkpoints that you should consider during your purchase process.  Let’s look at each of them in more detail. 1. Reliability Relentless reliability is key, and biometric gun safes must have accurate scanners, else they will fail to identify the user properly. A poorly-made scanner may not read the owner’s fingerprints, resulting in the owner being locked out of the safe. Beyond that, faulty scanners affect the level of security the safe provides. Some low-quality biometric handgun safes may allow unauthorized access, especially if they fail to record fingerprints properly at the time of installation. Buyers should beware of cheap safes, as these may have been made with the lowest-grade parts. A biometric safe offers little comfort if its key security measure malfunctions, so a safe that meets or exceeds current industry standards is the best option. It also pays to research the manufacturer to determine its reputation within the industry. 2. Bolted vs Unbolted Many biometric gun safes offer owners the option of bolting them to the floor or wall. Professional installers can help with this if the buyer does not feel comfortable doing it themselves. Bolting the safe prevents an intruder from picking up the safe and escaping with it. While most safes are heavy enough to prevent this without bolting, it’s an added security measure that makes many buyers feel more comfortable. But, bolts also prevent the owner from removing the safe in other situations. For example, the safe’s owner will have to go through the unbolting process whenever he or she moves the safe from one place to another. A bolted safe will also have to stay where it is in emergency situations, such as a house fire. 3. Shape and Size A biometric gun safe’s external measurements may not accurately reflect the amount of storage space it has. Remember that safes come in different shapes and sizes. Some provide minimal storage space for small valuables or smaller firearms , whereas others offer large amounts of space for things like larger pistols and holsters . Buyers should consider the items they wish to store in their safes before purchase. Check the dimensions, making sure that these relate to the interior of the safe. Many buyers choose safes that offer slightly more storage space than they need.  This is a smart thing to do, and the same principle applies when purchasing other accessories like cases . This offers easier access to the items inside the safe, which can prove crucial in a panic situation. 4. Alternative Access Regardless of the quality of the safe’s fingerprint scanner, there is always the potential for something to go wrong. The scanner may malfunction, or the user could find the safe fails to scan damaged fingers. Beyond that, scanners will stop functioning if their batteries run out. That means the safe should offer some means of alternative access. Many safes come with backup keys that the owner can use to manually override the fingerprint scanner. Others use more modern technology, such as mobile apps, to provide the same function. Having alternative access to a biometric gun safe prevents the user from having to call a professional safecracker if something goes wrong. 5. Certifications Several organizations in the United States offer approval to biometric gun safe manufacturers. These approvals usually show that the safe can store firearms without any issues. The most prominent of these organizations are the California Department of Justice and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) . Buyers should look for either organization’s seal of approval on any safes they consider buying. 6. Manufacturing Materials Most safe manufacturers use steel when designing biometric handgun safes, though some opt for aluminum. The thickness of the material reveals how effective it is at blocking outside intrusion. 8-gauge steel offers more protection than 16-gauge steel. Beyond that, buyers should examine the safe closely to spot any component issues. In particular, the door should fit snugly into its frame, with no room for any tools an intruder might use to pry the door open. "Our Eight Favorites" Those are the key features buyers should look at when searching for the best fingerprint gun safe. It’s up to the buyer to determine which features are most important to them, as not all safes will have them. Let’s move on to reviewing some of the best biometric gun safes on the market today.  We will take a deeper look at the technology, quality, size, capacity and more and compare it across our 8 favorites. 1. SentrySafe Pistol Safe Product SentrySafe QAP1BE Gun Safe with Biometric Lock, 1 Capacity Biometric gun safe provides secure storage for one standard... Pistol safe features a gas strut to instantly and quietly open... Handgun safe is constructed with solid steel and a pry resistant... Exterior: 12.1 in. W x 9.9 in. D. x 3.2 in. H; Interior 9.7 in. W... For optimal performance, SentrySafe recommends the use of four... Details Biometric gun safe provides secure storage for one standard... Pistol safe features a gas strut to instantly and quietly open... Handgun safe is constructed with solid steel and a pry resistant... Exterior: 12.1 in. W x 9.9 in. D. x 3.2 in. H; Interior 9.7 in. W... For optimal performance, SentrySafe recommends the use of four... SentrySafe’s product offers enough space for a single handgun and features a biometric lock that uses the owner’s fingerprints to provide access. Beyond that, the safe also uses a combination lock, offering added protection for the firearm stored inside. The keypad makes no noise upon combination entry, ensuring it does not alert intruders when the safe is in use. The small door contains a compression gas strut, which ensures the safe stays quiet upon being opened. This prevents the safe from alerting intruders should the user need to open it during a panic situation. SentrySafe has also built the door using 12-gauge solid steel and has implemented pry-resistant measures to ensure no outside access. The door opens quickly once the safe grants access, taking approximately one second to open fully. It also stays open, rather than swinging back shut. This allows for single-handed access, so a user can open the safe while calling for help using a cellphone. The small compartment inside the safe offers easy access to a firearm, especially for smaller calibers like the 22 . The safe itself also meets the requirements that the California Department of Justice has in place in regards to safe quality. Buyers receive an override key that they can use to open the safe should the scanner malfunction. Users should store this key in a safe location, as it could also provide access to intruders. Further, the safe has small holes on its undercarriage, which buyers can use to bolt the safe into place on a floor or shelf. Users can also mount the safe to a wall using these holds, with many choosing to mount the safe above their beds to provide easy access during panic situations. Having said that, SentrySafe has not designed this safe specifically as a wall-mounted product. Buyers receive a one-year manufacturer’s warranty with the product, which covers any mechanical or structural issues that arise due to poor workmanship or faulty materials. In our opinion, it’s the best overall value for your hard-earned cash. Specifications Weight – 12 pounds External dimensions – 3.2 x 12.0 x 9.9 inches Internal dimensions – 2.2 x 9.7 x 6.6 inches Construction material – 12-gauge steel Max fingerprints – Two Batteries required – 4x AA batteries Batteries supplied? – No Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Floor and shelf Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty 2. Gunvault SpeedVault SVB500 Product GunVault Speedvault Biometric Biometric Pistol Safe SVB500 Bio-metric fingerprint scanner & activation button Holds up to 20 individual fingerprints Multiple mounting options 18-gauge steel construction Mounting hardware included Bio metric fingerprint scanner and activation button; Holds up to... Details Bio-metric fingerprint scanner & activation button Holds up to 20 individual fingerprints Multiple mounting options 18-gauge steel construction Mounting hardware included Bio metric fingerprint scanner and activation button; Holds up to... Gunvault claims to have developed a revolutionary safe design with its SpeedVault SVB500. The safe uses a biometric finger scanner and activation button to provide access. Upon activation, the safe drops down a drawer where the user can place a handgun. This drawer also provides quick access when the user needs to take the gun out of the safe. The gun points holster-up when in the safe, meaning the user can draw the firearm out and have it ready to use straight after opening the safe. The safe can retain a maximum of 120 fingerprints, so several users can access the safe at any one time. This allows 12 people to register all ten of their fingerprints, so they can access the firearm inside the safe in any situation. The 18-gauge steel construction offers plenty of protection from outside forces. The safe also comes with foam padding on the inside, which will protect the contents when not in use. Gunvault claims the safe uses such precise fittings that it is virtually impossible to pry the door open with regular hand tools. This means that only those with fingerprint access can get to the gun inside the safe. The user can mount the safe anywhere, making it one of the more versatile biometric handgun safes available. Gunvault also notes that the user can mount the safe in any direction, so the user can choose the exact mounting configuration that suits them. The safe carries no water or fire rating, so it may not be the best fingerprint gun safe for those living in areas prone to flooding or fire. There is no warranty as standard with the safe, but users can get one if they contact Gunvault using the company’s customer service number. Specifications Weight – 7 pounds External dimensions – 13 x 3.5 x 6.5 inches Internal dimensions – None provided Construction material – 18-gauge steel Max fingerprints – 120 Batteries required – 1x 9V battery Batteries supplied? – No Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Anywhere Warranty – None provided, though customers can contact Gunvault to arrange one. 3. "Viking Security Safe" VS-25BL Product Viking Security Safe VS-25BL Biometric Safe Fingerprint Safe HIGHTLY SECURE 10” x 14” x 10” BIOMETRIC FINGERPRINT SAFE -... FAST ACCESS PERSONAL SAFE FOR HOME & OFFICE DEFENCE AND... EASY TO SET UP & SIMPLE TO USE - Scan & Save up to 32... PRY-RESISTANT by DESIGN, TIGHTLY SEALED SOLID STEEL BODY GUN SAFE... MODERN DESIGN, ROBUST MILITARY LOOK AND VERSATILE SIZE fits... Details HIGHTLY SECURE 10” x 14” x 10” BIOMETRIC FINGERPRINT SAFE -... FAST ACCESS PERSONAL SAFE FOR HOME & OFFICE DEFENCE AND... EASY TO SET UP & SIMPLE TO USE - Scan & Save up to 32... PRY-RESISTANT by DESIGN, TIGHTLY SEALED SOLID STEEL BODY GUN SAFE... MODERN DESIGN, ROBUST MILITARY LOOK AND VERSATILE SIZE fits... Viking Security Safe’s VS-25BL biometric gun safe comes with a carpeted interior, which offers more protection than most to the valuables placed inside. Imported from outside the United States, the safe will not scratch any jewelry or firearms placed inside. The safe uses a 500 Dots per Inch (DPI) fingerprint scanner, which can register all parts of the user’s fingerprint. This keeps accuracy issues to a minimum, ensuring the user does not have to worry about faulty reads during panic situations. It also comes with a keypad, which has an LCD screen above it that shows the user how much battery life the safe has left. Users can program codes between four and eight digits long using the keypad. Made using steel, the safe can hold up to 32 fingerprints. It stores these in a non-volatile memory unit, which ensures the safe retains previously registered fingerprints should the batteries run out. The door itself is 5 millimeters thick and will open in less than one second once the safe grants access to the user. This makes it ideal for panic situations, where quick access is a priority. The safe also emits warning beeps when the user leaves the door unlocked for over one minute. The dual motorized deadbolts provide added security, as too do the anti-pry insertion slots found on the door. These prevent intruders from using handheld tools to pry the door open using the deadbolts. Viking Security Safe has used laser cutting technology to build each component, ensuring they all slot together to create an impenetrable safe. Unlike many biometric handgun safes , the VS-25BL incorporates sound into the package. Users can toggle the sound on or off using the keypad. Upon opening, the safe turns its interior light on so the user can see exactly what he or she is doing. The VS-25BL’s exterior includes pre-drilled holes for use when mounting the safe. Users can mount the safe to the floor or a wall. The safe comes with no fire or waterproof certification. However, it does include a one-year limited manufacturer’s warranty, which covers faulty construction. It also comes with a manual override key, which the owner can use if the fingerprint scanner malfunctions. Specifications Weight – 26.6 pounds External dimensions – 10 x 14 x 10 inches Internal dimensions – None provided Construction material – Steel Max fingerprints – 32 Batteries required – 2x AA batteries Batteries supplied? – No Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Floor and wall Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty 4. VAULTEK VT20i Handgun Safe Product VAULTEK VT20i Biometric Handgun Safe Bluetooth Smart Pistol... UPGRADED ANTI-THEFT PROTECTION features anti-pry bars, two point... TOUGH AND RUGGED heavy-duty 16-gauge carbon steel construction... QUICK ACCESS to your valuables, documents, and firearm(s) from... SMART SAFE TECHNOLOGY a highly interactive experience from your... RESPONSIVE LED LIGHTING in low light situations so you can locate... Details UPGRADED ANTI-THEFT PROTECTION features anti-pry bars, two point... TOUGH AND RUGGED heavy-duty 16-gauge carbon steel construction... QUICK ACCESS to your valuables, documents, and firearm(s) from... SMART SAFE TECHNOLOGY a highly interactive experience from your... RESPONSIVE LED LIGHTING in low light situations so you can locate... The VT20i immediately stands out with its impressive design. It will look sleek and stylish in any room. That design does not come at the cost of practicality, though. The safe offers everything a user may expect from a high-quality biometric gun safe . VAULTEK have upgraded their previous anti-theft security measures to make this safe one of the most secure biometric pistol safes around. The anti-pry bars and anti-impact latches prevent anybody from accessing the safe from the outside using handheld tools. The safe also boasts interior hinges, so an intruder won’t be able to use a screwdriver to remove the door. All of these security features combine with a set of internal security brackets, making the safe just as rugged on the inside as it is on the outside. The biometric scanner detects fingerprints quickly and is capable of storing up to 20 individual prints. Once activated, the safe’s door pens quickly to provide almost immediate access to any valuables stored inside. Unlike many other biometric handgun safes , the VT20i comes with a rechargeable lithium battery. Users can charge this battery using the micro-USB kit included in the package, with charging itself taking 2.5 hours. Once charged, the battery will last for four months. VAULTEK has used 16-gauge carbon steel to build the safe, which it protects with a powder coat finish that protects the safe from corrosive substances. The safe also makes use of modern technology more effectively than many of its competitors. Purchase provides the user with access to the VAULTEK Bluetooth App, which they can use to check the safe’s battery status and adjust the interior lighting settings. The app also provides a backup override function, as it can open the safe remotely. The safe meets the California Department of Justice’s 2017 regulations, marking it out as one of the safest biometric pistol safes around. It also comes with mounting holes attached, so users can bolt it to the wall or floor. VAULTEK provides the mounting equipment needed to do this. VAULTEK’s VT20i series does not include water or fireproofing. However, it comes with a one-year limited manufacturer’s warranty, which protects against any manufacturing defects. Specifications Weight – 9.9 pounds External dimensions – 11.5 x 9.0 x 2.75 inches Internal dimensions – 11 x 5.75 x 2 inches Construction material – 16-gauge carbon steel Max fingerprints – 20 Batteries required – 1x rechargeable lithium battery Batteries supplied? – Yes Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Floor and wall Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty 5. Barska Biometric with Fingerprint Lock Product BARSKA Biometric Safe Secure Storage: Our DOJ approved safe comes with a 120... The Optional Silent Mode: Safe features a silent mode that... Solid Construction: This safe is built with durable steel,... Mounting: Pre-drilled holes and hardware allow the safe to anchor... Mortorized Deadbolts: Safe comes with 2 solid steal motorized... Details Secure Storage: Our DOJ approved safe comes with a 120... "The Optional Silent" Mode: Safe features a silent mode that... Solid Construction: This safe is built with durable steel,... Mounting: Pre-drilled holes and hardware allow the safe to anchor... Mortorized Deadbolts: Safe comes with 2 solid steal motorized... Despite its basic appearance, the Barska Biometric Gun Safe offers stellar protection against outside intrusion. A single-shelf safe, it packs plenty of depth. This means owners can use it to store valuables, such as jewelry, as well as firearms. This added space also makes ammo storage easy. Many users find that they can store their handguns alongside several boxes of ammo using this biometric handgun safe . Barska has used several materials to build the safe, and it is imported from outside the United States. Unfortunately, the safe is one of the slowest to open on this list. It will take approximately three seconds from the moment of fingerprint scanning for the door to open. The safe’s biometric scanner is battery-operated. Once the battery starts running low, the safe will emit a beeping noise to alert the owner. Users can still access the safe if the battery dies, as it comes with two backup manual override keys. But, the user needs to unscrew a small flap to access the keyhole, which may not be ideal in panic situations. Still, this flap does add an extra layer of protection that may prevent an intruder from using the keys to access the safe. The scanner itself can store a maximum of 30 fingerprints, making the safe ideal for households with multiple occupants who need access to the safe. The scanner works well, as long as the user follows the detailed instructions included with the safe. Barska has also pre-drilled holes into the safe’s exterior, which owners can use to mount the safe onto the floor or wall. Some may choose to mount the safe in their vehicles, though its size makes this difficult in regular cars. The safe also comes with bolts for mounting purposes. The safe beeps upon opening, but this can be turned off. However, it will also beep if the owner leaves the safe open for more than five minutes. This will not stop until the user closes the safe’s door again. Barska provides a 12-month limited manufacturer’s warranty that protects this biometric pistol safe from manufacturing defects. Unfortunately, the safe offers no protection against water or fire damage. Specifications Weight – 34.1 pounds External dimensions – 10 x 18 x 18 inches Internal dimensions – None provided Construction material – Multiple materials Max fingerprints – 30 Batteries required – 4x AA batteries Batteries supplied? – Yes Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Floor and wall Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty 6. Barska "Top Opening Safe" Product BARSKA AX11556 Biometric Fingerprint Top Opening Security... Secure Storage: Our DOJ approved safes comes with a 120... The Optional Silent Mode: The safe features a silent mode that... Solid Construction: This safe is built with durable steel,... Mounting: The safe comes with pre-drilled holes and mounting... Motorized Deadbolts: The safe comes with 2 solid steal motorized... Details Secure Storage: Our DOJ approved safes comes with a 120... The Optional Silent Mode: The safe features a silent mode that... Solid Construction: This safe is built with durable steel,... Mounting: The safe comes with pre-drilled holes and mounting... Motorized Deadbolts: The safe comes with 2 solid steal motorized... Barska returns with another cost-effective choice . This safe differs from the previous one on the list because it features a top-opening design, which makes it ideal for use as an embedded floor safe. The safe shares many of the same features as the previous Barska biometric gun safe . The scanner can store up to 30 fingerprints, which should be more than enough to cover the number of people in the average household. It also comes with pre-drilled holes for mounting on a floor or shelf. The package also includes all of the hardware needed to mount the safe. However, the top-opening design makes shelf mounting inconvenient, as the user will need to reach over the top of the safe to get to whatever is inside. The safe comes with a motorized deadbolt lock, and two steel locking bolts, which provide plenty of protection for its contents. These bolts may make a small amount of noise when opening the safe, but this is fairly minimal. Beyond that, the safe features a floor mat, which protects any valuables that may otherwise be damaged due to contact with the metal interior. It also comes with two AA batteries that will last approximately two years. Please note that this time may vary depending on how often the safe is used. Users don’t need to worry about drained batteries preventing access to the safe. In addition to a beeping system, which lets the user know if the batteries need replacing, the safe comes with a pair of manual override keys. These provide easy access in case the scanner malfunctions, or the batteries run out. Barska includes a detailed user manual with the safe, which covers any issues users may have in regards to its installation or use. It is important to keep the fingerprint scanner clean, so it’s advised to use a dry cloth to wipe it down after every use. Barska also recommends checking the scanner every six months to confirm that it still reads the registered fingerprints. The safe is not waterproof or fireproof but it is of sturdy construction and also comes with a one-year limited warranty. This protects against any manufacturing defects. Specifications Weight – 21 pounds External dimensions – 14.75 x 11.25 x 5 inches Internal dimensions – 14.5 x 11 x 2.5 inches Construction material – Steel Max fingerprints – 30 Batteries required – 4x AA batteries Batteries supplied? – Yes Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Floor and wall Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty 7. The GunBox 2.0 Pistol Safe Product The GunBox 2.0 The Smartest Quick Access Gun Safe, Billet... Quick access 360-degree biometric fingerprint scanner (holds... Quick access RFiD scanner (opens using a key card or a fob... Audible motion and tamper alarm that emits a loud noise if box is... 2 USB ports for charging devices or connecting accessories +... For home or vehicle use - FAA approved container to safely... Details Quick access 360-degree biometric fingerprint scanner (holds... Quick access RFiD scanner (opens using a key card or a fob... Audible motion and tamper alarm that emits a loud noise if box is... 2 USB ports for charging devices or connecting accessories +... For home or vehicle use - FAA approved container to safely... The GunBox 2.0 stands out as it is the only safe on this list that has the "Federal Aviation Administration" (FAA) approval. This means the owner can install the safe in a vehicle, protected by the knowledge that it has been tested as a safe means to protect a firearm during transport. It also includes the widest range of options for opening. Alongside fingerprint recognition, the safe recognizes input from a Bluetooth app and several accessories that come packaged with the safe. These include two Radio-frequency identification (RFID) keycards and a pair of fobs. The app, which is downloadable from iTunes and Google Play, has several other functions too. It can be used to set up additional fingerprint recognition when the user is away from the safe. Beyond that, it registers any additional fobs or keycards the user buys. Beyond that, the app allows the user to tinker with the safe’s internal light settings and adjust the sensitivity of the fingerprint scanner. It’s best to secure this box in one spot, as it has a tamper alarm. The alarm activates whenever somebody moves or bumps the GunBox 2.0, instantly alerting the user if an intruder tries to break into the safe. Users can change the tone and volume of the alarm using the app. The fingerprint scanner can recognize a maximum of 100 fingerprints, so ten people could register every digit if desired. The safe features industry-leading biometric technology, so users should find no issues arising due to a faulty scanner. Mounting doesn’t present any problems as the GunBox 2.0 comes with pre-installed holes for mounting on any surface. The owner can even choose the orientation, making this one of the most flexible biometric handgun safes on the market. The safe comes with two USB ports, which can be used to charge phones and other devices. All told, the internal battery lasts for approximately 18 months, though this may vary depending on how often the safe is used to charge other devices. The GunBox 2.0 comes with a one-year warranty, starting from the shipping date. Much like the other safes on this list, it does not come with water or fireproofing features. Specifications Weight – 7.2 pounds External dimensions – 10 x 11.6 x 2.7 inches Internal dimensions – None provided Construction material – 4mm die-cast aluminum Max fingerprints – 100 Batteries required – Internal battery Batteries supplied? – Yes Color – Choice of black, white, or grey Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Anywhere Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty 8. "Barska Compact Security" Safe Product BARSKA AX11620 Biometric Fingerprint Mini Security Home Safe... Secure Storage: Our DOJ approved safes comes with a 120... The Optional Silent Mode: The safe features a silent mode that... Solid Construction: This safe is built with durable steel,... Mounting: The safe comes with pre-drilled holes and mounting... Motorized Deadbolts: The safe comes with 2 solid steal motorized... Details Secure Storage: Our DOJ approved safes comes with a 120... The Optional Silent Mode: The safe features a silent mode that... Solid Construction: This safe is built with durable steel,... Mounting: The safe comes with pre-drilled holes and mounting... Motorized Deadbolts: The safe comes with 2 solid steal motorized... Barska rounds out the list with another great option. A smaller safe than the rest of the Barska products, this safe still has many of the same features that have made Barska a leading brand of safe manufacturers. In fact, the safe’s smaller stature can offer additional peace of mind to the user. It can be stored almost anywhere, which means the user can keep the safe out of the hands of any children who might try to tamper with it. This also makes the safe easy to conceal. It comes with pre-drilled holes, which allow for mounting on walls and shelves. Installation is a breeze, so most people won’t have to call professionals to get the safe mounted. Barska has used several materials to build this safe, with the steel body ensuring it offers protection against any outside intrusion. The company bolsters this protection with a pair of steel locking bolts, which keep the door wedged shut when the safe is not in use. Of course, the biometric fingerprint scanner offers even more protection. Capable of holding up to 30 fingerprints, the scanner ensures only those with access to the safe can open it. The safe also comes with two backup keys, which can be used to open the safe if something goes wrong with the scanner. Barska protects the keyhole with a small flap, which requires a screwdriver for removal. The safe offers fast access with one touch of a registered finger, plus the user can activate the silent access feature to ensure no intruders hear the safe opening. Furthermore, the safe carries approval from the California Department of Justice for use with firearms. Users can feel safe in the knowledge that nothing untoward will happen to their firearms while they’re in storage. Barska offers a one-year limited manufacturer’s warranty. Unfortunately, the safe will not protect its contents from water or fire damage. Specifications Weight – 12 pounds External dimensions – 11.8 x 7.8 x 7.8 inches Internal dimensions – 11.6 x 7.6 x 5.9 inches Construction material – Steel Max fingerprints – 30 Batteries required – 4x AA batteries Batteries supplied? – Yes Color – Black Fireproof – No Waterproof – No Mounting – Floor and wall Warranty – One-year limited manufacturer’s warranty Parting Shots Each safe we’ve looked at comes with an array of features beyond fingerprint recognition, with the most impressive being capable of recognizing input from mobile apps as well as the user. In choosing the best biometric gun safe for your money, it’s important to look at how much value each safe offers in return for the cost. When all is said and done, the SentrySafe biometric safe is probably our favorite purely due to the fact it’s been mass-produced and most of the kinks have been worked out over time.  It’s also an extremely good value for the money, and it’s what our managing editor trusts his CZ 75 9mm pistol with. The SentrySafe biometric safe is a great pick for any handgun enthusiast, just due to the fact that it can be easily mounted through the mounting holes at the bottom of the safe, and has 3 different entry routes between the fingerprint pad, digital code or panic key entry. While we are fans of the SentrySafe, any one of the picks you’ve read about here will get the job done. This product was presentation was made with AAWP plugin.

Major Changes to NFA Coming? We Hope So

Major Changes to NFA Coming? We Hope So

Are major changes to the NFA coming ? For many of us who have waded through the piles of ATF forms in order to obtain restricted items like short barrel rifles, silencers and machine guns we sure hope so. In 2017 there really is no reason that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives to be operating on a largely paper system just like they did with the passage of the National Firearms Act of 1936. Ancient thinking and unwillingness to expand and adapt to new technology has made the agency largely ineffective and has slowed down it’s ability to process any sort of volume of paperwork. The crack in the bureaucratic armor of the BATFE might be showing with the latest “leaked” opinion letter from Associate Deputy Director, Ronald Turk. The memo known as the “White Paper” hit the internet with hurricane force and within minutes was posted on nearly every internet gun related chat room and forum. Problems and rumors occurred almost the second that the letter was “leaked”. I use quotes around the word leaked because I don’t feel it was leaked at all, the letter was released without an official statement so as to gauge the amount of rage it would generate with the anti gun community. If the anti gunners went into a rage the BATFE could say it was an unofficial opinion, if no rage happened then they wouldn’t have to do a thing. The problem with this so called “White Letter” is that not a lot of people have read it. So we decided to post the main bulletins of the letter, free of red tape or legalized CFR induced nausea. Most gun owners I know are focusing on points 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8. I personally don’t see the anti gunners in the United States Congress allowing major changes to the NFA such as removing suppressors or short barreled rifles from the registry. What exactly does it say ? Points for Discussion: 1. New Federal Firearms Licensees (FFL) Dealing Exclusively at Gun Shows (or internet): For over two years representatives within the firearms licensing community have asked for clarification and/or a decision from ATF regarding new FFL applicants requesting to conduct business solely at gun shows. ATF has delayed a decision or guidance due to several concerns including what it means to be “engaged in the business” of selling firearms, and ATF’s ability to have access to a dealer’s records where they may not have routine business hours. ATF has already recognized FFL activities via the internet without a classic “storefront” and is considering whether to include gun show only activities in a similar manner. The marketplace has changed significantly in recent years, and ATF’s guidance to FFLs on these issues has not kept pace with developments in commerce. Classic “brick and mortar” storefronts with an on-hand inventory and set “front-door” business hours often no longer apply in today’s modern marketplace. A question remains as to whether ATF should consider simply changing past policy or initiate a lengthy regulation rule change process. There is ample room for immediate action on this issue. ATF can simply issue new guidance immediately and adjust past policy to allow for a business to obtain a license with the primary intention of selling firearms with the transfer occurring at a location other than the business’s physical premises (whether at guns shows, over the internet, or elsewhere). This practice has in fact already been taking place, and ATF has provided guidance to FFLs allowing such activity with regards to internet only sales. Provided the business is established at a location in full compliance with state and local laws/ordinances and the business is reasonably inspectable by ATF at an established business location, limited or no actual sales out the business’s front door should not be an issue. If a formal regulation rule change is needed for long-term clarification, ATF can start that process while immediately issuing a policy change to the above practice which would have no negative impact to public safety. In fact, it would encourage more sales and business through a licensee, including background checks on sales at gun show events, and likely increase public safety. Several national gun show promoters prefer to have licensees at their shows, which also somewhat reduces the so-called “gun show loophole” concerns some have expressed about such venues. ATF recently issued guidance regarding what it means to be “engaged in the business” and indicated that: “A person can be engaged in the business of dealing in firearms regardless of the location in which firearm transactions are conducted. For example, a person can be engaged in the business of dealing in firearms even if the person only conducts firearm transactions at gun shows or through the internet.” Thus, by establishing that persons can be required to obtain a license to sell only at gun shows, ATF must provide reasonable means for businesses to obtain a license. ATF can provide guidance to the public for gun show-only dealers similar that which was posted for internet-only firearms dealers. There is no apparent downside to such a proposal, and in fact public safety is enhanced. 2. Armor Piercing Ammunition: ATF has regulatory authority to classify what is and is not armor piercing (AP) ammunition. Several major ammunition manufacturing companies have had requests pending for years to produce AP ammunition (AP ammo or ammo) which is not intended for use in a handgun and potentially lawful under Federal law. In 2014, ATF proposed a framework that would have provided a transparent and fair review process for these applications, and would have resulted in the approval of many of the long-pending requests. The framework, however, also would have withdrawn the 5.56 “green tip” AP ammo exemption that has existed since 1986. The withdrawal of the exemption created controversy that ultimately stalled all AP ammo classification decisions. Since that time, ATF has been asked to hold off on any AP ammo determinations. Continued inaction on these requests poses significant litigation and reputational risks to ATF. ATF can readily mitigate these risks by using the criteria established in the framework to process and approve many of the applications, while leaving the 5.56 “green tip” AP ammunition exemption intact. Moving forward with approval of these applications is consistent with the statutory goal of protecting the public and law enforcement because, consistent with the statutory exemption, the projectiles involved are not associated with criminal use, but instead are clearly designed and intended for hunting and sporting purposes (the projectiles/calibers at issue will generally penetrate body armor regardless of whether AP-classified metals are used in the manufacturing process). If decisional restrictions were removed, ATF could readily apply drafted standards for reviewing AP ammo requests while leaving the 5.56 “green tip” AP ammo exemption intact. Many of the industries’ pending requests could be decided in a timely manner, meeting both statutory requirements and safety concerns within the law. 3. Re-importation of Certain Department of Defense Surplus Firearms from Foreign Countries: The State Department and ATF have worked over the past several years with the Administration on requests for the importation of U.S. origin military firearms, ammunition, and parts that were once sent overseas to support allies. There are surplus rifles, pistols, ammunition, and other importable U.S. origin Curio and Relic (C&R) defense articles (including M1 Garand and Carbine rifles) and pistols (M1911) overseas awaiting importation authority. There is no clear public safety reason why taxpayer-funded US-origin C&R defense articles should be denied re-importation to the American public, while many non-U.S.- origin C&R items are approved. Additionally, these items do not represent any discernable public safety concern, as demand lies with collectors of vintage military firearms. Importation and sale through licensed dealers would effectively regulate the lawful transfer of these firearms through a licensee and a background check. Joint effort from the Administration, State Department, and ATF could easily reverse past decisions and allow for the safe and legal importation and sale of these historical and collectible items. Many M1 Garand rifles have been approved for importation in the past, setting precedence for this to occur. The more recent denials were in part due to perceived potential that they may be used in crimes, for which there is little, if any, evidence for such a concern. 4. Title 18, United States Code (U.S.C.), Section 922(o): Current law precludes FFLs who are registered Special Occupational Taxpayers (FFL/SOT) from transferring machineguns manufactured post-1986 unless they are for export or for law enforcement/government use; and there is no provision for the transfer from one FFL/SOT to another. This is somewhat detrimental to FFL/SOTs operating within the small, but useful, Department of Defense-supported industry and theatrical armorer community. One option, if supported by the Department of Justice (DOJ), would be to re-institute ATF’s ability to provide variances to licensees, as ATF has done in the past, that would adequately provide form transfers within defense industry FFLs and avoid a requirement to change the statute. Use of variances in a consistent and fair process within the limited DoD- supported FFL/SOT community would be viewed favorably by the industry and have no impact on public safety. 5. Firearm Arm or Stabilizing Brace: Manufacturers have produced an arm brace or stabilizing brace which is designed to strap a handgun to a forearm to allow a disabled shooter to fire the firearm. ATF determined that the brace was not a stock, and therefore its attachment to a handgun did not constitute the making of a short-barreled rifle or “any other firearm” under the National Firearms Act (NFA). (NFA classification subjects the product to a tax and registration requirement.) In the determination letter, however, ATF indicated that if the brace was held to the shoulder and used as a stock, such use would constitute a “redesign” that would result in classification of the brace/handgun combination as an NFA firearm (i.e., the “use” would be a “redesign” and making of a short-barreled rifle). ATF has not made another NFA determination where a shooter’s use alone was deemed be a “redesign” of the product/firearm resulting in an NFA classification. This ruling has caused confusion and concern among firearm manufacturers, dealers, and consumers about the extent to which unintended use of a product may be a basis for NFA classification. To mitigate this confusion and concern, ATF could amend the determination letter to remove the language indicating that simple use of a product for a purpose other than intended by the manufacturer – without additional proof or redesign – may result in re-classification as an NFA weapon. While many at ATF are concerned about manufacturing processes continuing to push the boundaries between a Gun Control Act (GCA) and an NFA firearm, ATF has a relatively consistent history of what crosses the line between GCA and NFA firearms with which to draw from, and still maintains the ability to exercise good judgement with future requests based upon the firearm’s individual characteristics. 6. Reissue a New Sporting Purpose Study: Since the sunset of the Assault Weapons ban in 2004, the use of AR-15s, AK-style, and similar rifles now commonly referred to as “modern sporting rifles” has increased exponentially in sport shooting. These firearm types are now standard for hunting activities. ATF could re-examine its almost 20-year- old study to bring it up to date with the sport shooting landscape of today, which is vastly different than what it was years ago. Action shooting sports and organizations such as 3 Gun and the United States Practical Shooting Association (USPSA) have also drastically expanded in recent years. Restriction on imports serves questionable public safety interests, as these rifles are already generally legally available for manufacture and ownership in the United States. Low cost foreign made firearms are also still imported and converted into “non-sporting” configurations. These restrictions have placed many limitations on importers, while at the same time imposing a heavy workload on ATF’s Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division. ATF’s Imports Branch also possesses a list of firearms approved for import but has not made this list public. Lists such as this can be made available to the public so that the importing community does not have to guess as to what the standard for importation is. Many concerns from the firearms industry could be re-examined through the publication of a new Sporting Purpose Study along with an updated Imports Branch Guide 7. Creation of a Database of Agency Rulings: ATF lacks a consistent internal database to maintain and readily access private letters and ruling. The public also has no direct access to public rulings in a manageable format. The inability to access these rulings can create inconsistent agency interpretations of agency guidance. ATF can create a retrievable database for internal use that includes access by the public for open rulings. 8. Silencers: Current Federal law requires ATF to regulate silencers under the NFA. This requires a Federal tax payment of $200 for transfers, ATF approval, and entry of the silencer into a national NFA database. In the past several years, opinions about silencers have changed across the United States. Their use to reduce noise at shooting ranges and applications within the sporting and hunting industry are now well recognized. At present, 42 states generally allow silencers to be used for sporting purposes. The wide acceptance of silencers and corresponding changes in state laws have created substantial demand across the country. This surge in demand has caused ATF to have a significant backlog on silencer applications. ATF’s processing time is now approximately 8 months. ATF has devoted substantial resources in attempts to reduce processing times, spending over $1 million annually in overtime and temporary duty expenses, and dedicating over 33 additional full-time and contract positions since 2011 to support NFA processing. Despite these efforts, NFA processing times are widely viewed by applicants and the industry as far too long, resulting in numerous complaints to Congress. Since silencers account for the vast majority of NFA applications, the most direct way to reduce processing times is to reduce the number of silencer applications. In light of the expanding demand and acceptance of silencers, however, that volume is unlikely to diminish unless they are removed from the NFA. While DOJ and ATF have historically not supported removal of items from the NFA, the change in public acceptance of silencers arguably indicates that the reason for their inclusion in the NFA is archaic and historical reluctance to removing them from the NFA should be reevaluated. ATF’s experience with the criminal use of silencers also supports reassessing their inclusion in the NFA. On average in the past 10 years, ATF has only recommended 44 defendants a year for prosecution on silencer-related violations; of those, only approximately 6 of the defendants had prior felony convictions. Moreover, consistent with this low number of prosecution referrals, silencers are very rarely used in criminal shootings. Given the lack of criminality associated with silencers, it is reasonable to conclude that they should notnbe viewed as a threat to public safety necessitating NFA classification, and should be considered for reclassification under the GCA. If such a change were to be considered, a revision in the definition of a silencer would be important. The current definition of a silencer extends to “any combination of [silencer] parts,” as well as “any part intended only for use in” a silencer. Compared to the definition of a firearm, which specifies the frame or receiver is the key regulated part, any individual silencer part is generally regulated just as if it were a completed silencer. Revising the definition could eliminate many of the current issues encountered by silencer manufacturers and their parts suppliers. Specifically, clarifying when a part or combination of parts meets a minimum threshold requiring serialization would be useful. 9. Firearms Industry Proposals to Allow for Interstate Sale of Firearms at Gun Shows: 18 U.S.C. 923(j) and supporting regulations prohibit FFLs from conducting firearms sales outside the state in which they are licensed and reside. Many FFLs would like to be able to travel to other states to venues like a gun show and conduct business. ATF currently allows an FFL to travel to another state, display firearms for sale and take orders, but not to transfer firearms on-site (this must take place back at the FFL’s business location in their home state, and only to a resident of their home state). Similarly, FFLs can transfer firearms out of state to another licensee under an “advance consignment” before the gun show to the out-of-state licensee in a somewhat convoluted process where the traveling/transferring FFL is no longer making the sale. ATF and DOJ have historically opposed removal of the statutory restriction on direct interstate firearm sales by FFLs. Further discussion would be beneficial. A change that could allow FFLs to operate at out-of-state gun shows (where also allowed by individual state laws) would have no detrimental effect on public safety and still provide ATF a means to trace firearms. It would also be viewed favorably by the broader firearms community. Since an FFL has a license, maintains records, and conducts background checks for sales, provided they are in compliance with State and local laws, there is no apparent harm or risk to public safety in allowing them to do so, but not for the current statute and interpretation requiring in-state only sales. Sales would be documented and traceable, and a background check would be completed. 10. Destructive Devices: The current definitions for destructive devices under both the NFA (26 U.S.C., 5845(f)) and the GCA (18 U.S.C., 921(a)(4)), and applicable controls, do not differentiate between destructive device launchers and destructive device munitions. Applicable regulatory and statutory controls under the GCA and NFA are focused on multi-use objects, such as typical long guns or machine guns, not single-use, expendable munitions which are also subject to the Safe Explosives Act. The customer base for destructive device munitions is very limited—the U.S. DoD, foreign governments as approved by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) under current export policy, and small numbers of other destructive device launcher and/or munitions manufacturers for use in research, testing, or assistance in United States Government /foreign contract fulfillment. In addition, the cost of munitions production runs, safety, and contract fulfillment requirements such as applicable DoD marking requirements necessitate, at a minimum, different standards for marking munitions than are possible for launchers. This includes marking by lot numbers and having multiple dispositions against a single lot number. There are several different ways to revise applicable controls to help solve these issues, as being currently discussed by ATF and destructive device munitions industry members. ATF should continue to discuss these issues with leadership and the industry to explore changes that would be useful to the defense munitions industry and have discernable impact on public safety or ATF’s ability to regulate them. 11. Demand Letter 2 (DL 2): An ATF regulation currently provides that all FFLs that have had 10 or more guns with a time-to-crime of 3 years or less traced to them in the previous year must provide ATF with copies of limited information from used firearms they acquired in that previous year. This equates to limited “used” or “gray market” gun information (no purchaser information is directly stored by ATF, only gun information) that can be used to expand the success rate of traces for secondary market firearms. This information can be useful to further crime gun trace capabilities by creating a pointer to allow for a more current firearms trace to a secondary purchaser. ATF originally set the threshold for DL2 reporting at 25 firearms, but later reduced that number to 10 firearms. ATF is currently re-examining the program and anticipates a change to the number (somewhere in the vicinity of 15 or more) based on trend and data analysis. Some have argued that DL 2 creates a burden on firearms dealers to provide ATF information on used firearms that may become, but are not necessarily, crime guns. An increase in the firearms requirement above 10 would likely have a positive impact on the firearms industry and still meet program objectives. ATF should continue to examine data to determine where the appropriate number of firearms lies to best manage this program. 12. Demand Letter 3 (DL 3): Via regulation ATF currently requires FFLs in several southwest border states to record and submit multiple sales records for certain semi-automatic rifles capable of shooting with a detached magazine (although not defined as such by law or regulation, this applies to the sale of more than one rifle commonly referred to as “modern sporting rifles,” sold to the same person at the same time). This requirement came into effect several years ago in an attempt to curb the flow of rifles from commerce to the criminal element via illegal firearms trafficking into Mexico and South America. There are examples where this regulation has proven effective and may provide a deterrent effect. Over the past 5 years, ATF has over 40,000 multiple sales reports involving over 90,000 rifles; opened over 300 investigations, and recommended approximately 374 defendants for prosecution. DL 3 places some burden on the firearms industry via reporting requirements. The elimination of DL 3 could have a detrimental effect on ATF’s criminal enforcement mission based on the numbers of investigations and defendants seen to date, but can be further discussed regarding utility and impact. 13. Pending ATF Regulation Regarding FFL Records Retention (20 years): ATF has a regulation pending at DOJ to increase the requirements for FFLs to retain records indefinitely. The current standard is 20 years, and records older than 20 years can be destroyed. The intent of the change from 20 years to indefinite retention is to provide access to records for firearms traces over longer periods of time. However, many argue that crime guns are not frequently recovered with times to crimes from purchases over 20 years old. Also, older firearms possessed by criminals frequently transfer hands several times and a trace will often not lead to the criminal after so much time has passed. ATF has averaged approximately 1,200 failed traces a year over the past 5 years due to records destruction, accounting for less than one half of one percent of traces conducted nationally each year. While such an extension is arguably a viable law enforcement intelligence tool, much of the firearms industry is opposed to such a change and a closer review of this proposal could be beneficial. 14. Expanding Permissive Use of NICS Checks by FFL Holders: Standard pre-employment background checks frequently do not reveal that a person is firearms-disabled. Other than requiring potential new-hires to purchase a firearm, licensees, in particular large retailers, are frequently unable to determine that an employee cannot be involved in firearms operations. Retailers would appreciate the ability to run a NICS check on current employees or potential new hires to ascertain whether they can legally fulfill their job requirements. A key aspect of this proposal is that it would be entirely elective; if the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), ATF and others all concurred with this slight expansion of the use of NICS, there would be no mandate that licensees perform a NICS check on all employees. Keeping the expansion of the system limited to elective employee checks will prevent any significant increase in cost to the FBI or ATF (in terms of running background checks or expanding regulatory enforcement), while it will enable FFLs to increase their compliance with existing regulations and help ensure firearms-disabled personnel do not have easy access to firearms. Businesses could also be required to certify that permissive NICS checks were only used on impacted employees or face sanctions for misuse of the system.

Firearm Auction News: The Benefit Gun

Firearm Auction News: The Benefit Gun

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2851a17_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2851a17_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Besides firearms auctions that cater to private gun collectors and vintage gun aficionados, there are other firearms auctions happening regularly around the country. They are sponsored by sportsmen conservation groups  and guns are sometimes auctioned off as a fund raising tool. There is a new twist on that and it's the concept of the “benefit gun.” In an article in the La Crosse Tribune , reporter Chris Hubbach tells the story of a a bolt-action Remington 721 that has raised $40,00. It works like this: get the winning bid on the gun and then later donate back to another auction when someone is in need. Since 2005, the gun has been auctioned numerous times, twelve plaques accompany the gun and the temporary owners record their history of acquiring the rifle. It's a positive story about firearms and this auction fund raising model could be used to support any good cause. Read the complete story here . The 721 was introduced in 1948 and discontinued in 1962 with approximately 118,000 manufactured. It was offered in the following calibers: .264, .270, .280, .30-06 and 300 H&H. According to the Standard Catalog of Firearms , the 721 is valued at $450 for one in excellent condition and $125 for one in poor condition. Merle (Mike) Walker, the designer of the Remington 721 In the 1982 edition of the Gun Digest annual, author Stuart Otteson reviews the pros and cons of the gun in “Remington's 721–722: THE STORY OF A SUCCESS.” It seems like the gun was a hit in its day and was the forerunner to the great Model 700: Related GunDigest Articles Gallery: Preview of Morphy's Upcoming Gun Auction Gallery: James D. Julia's October Gun Auction Thrills Eclectic Gun Auction Stirs Up Big Bucks “An opportune juxtaposition of a good rifle, low retail price, and booming post-war demand for high power hunting rifles brought an acceptance and sales volume that took even Remington by surprise. Favorable articles and evaluations began pouring in so fast that the Marketing Department compiled a 23-page booklet entitled “What The Experts Say About the New Remington Models 721 & 722 Big Game Rifles.” It contained twenty write-ups, which appeared in print during the first four months of 1948, ranging all the way from a brief announcement in the New York Times, to an exhaustive dual evaluation in The American Rifleman by the esteemed team of Julian Hatcher and Al Barr.”

Best Shooting Sticks for 2020 Comprehensive Buyers Guide

Best Shooting Sticks for 2020  Comprehensive Buyers Guide

Finding the best shooting sticks can be a challenge, especially if you have never used a shooting stick before and have no idea of how it works or what it’s used for. If you’re one of the handful of people who don’t know what they are, don’t worry. We’ll give you a brief synopsis of what they are and what their intended function is. On top of that, we’ll also unveil our list of the six best shooting sticks currently on the market as of this writing. Before we do, we’ll also talk about the type of shooting sticks that are available and how you can find one for your own use. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Shooting Sticks (GM) OUR TOP PICK: Bog-pod Shooting Sticks Vanguard Scout B62 Shooting Stick Caldwell Adjustable Ambidextrous Rifle Shooting Rest BEST BUDGET OPTION: Hammers Shooting Stick Caldwell XLA Fixed Sling Stud Bipod with Fast Expand Legs Comparison of the Best Shooting Sticks IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Bog-pod Shooting Sticks Best overall shooting stick. Made from high-quality aluminum. Bipod design for seated or prone position shooting. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Vanguard Scout "B62 Shooting Stick" Bipod design. Lightweight at 1 pound. It can be extended to 62 inches in height. "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Caldwell Adjustable "Ambidextrous Rifle Shooting" Rest Tripod design. Best shooting stick for the money. Adjusts from 20 inches to 42 inches high. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option "Hammers Shooting Stick" Camera mount stud included. Best monopod shooting stick. Telescopic adjustments from 29 inches to 63 inches. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Caldwell XLA "Fixed Sling Stud" Bipod with "Fast Expand Legs" Weighs 19 ounces. Best bipod stick for shooting. Telescoping adjustments from 13.5 to 27 inches in height. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Primos Hunting Trigger Stick Gen 3 Short Tripod Best tripod shooting stick. Adjusts from 18 to 38 inches in height. Strong rotating joint for panning around. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a Shooting Stick and What is it Used For? A shooting stick is basically a rest for your rifle or firearm of choice. The chief intent of these shooting sticks is to provide you with a great deal of stability so you are able to shoot accurate, precise shots. US Soldier using a M14 equipped with a two-legged shooting stick ( Source ) This will be a solution if you’re having a hard time holding a rifle or pistol straight during any kind of application. These sticks are usually used in hunting and target shooting situations. Types of Shooting Sticks There are a few different types of shooting sticks currently available. But which one is best for you? Which one will fit your personal needs and preferences? These are questions that you might ask while you’re looking for a shooting stick of your own. Here are the most popular types among current users: Monopod Shooting Sticks This is your one-legged shooting stick. You can easily adjust the height to your exact specifications. It can be lengthened and shortened with an easy to use mechanism. Pretty simple, right? If you’re looking for a shooting stick that will allow you to keep moving even hunting applications, you’ll likely benefit from a monopod. Source Bipod Shooting Stick Of course, this is your two-legged version of a shooting stick. Obviously, with the additional leg, it will be much more stable than a single monopod. This type of shooting stick is best used for shooters who prefer shooting from the prone position. Tripod Shooting Sticks If three legs are what you are looking for, then this is the shooting stick you want. Once again, this might be a stick best used for prone position shooters. In terms of stability, this is the most stable of the bunch. However, it might take slightly longer to get these set up than with either a monopod or a bipod. A major downside is that a tripod will not allow for much in terms of mobility due to the added weight. Plus, they take a lot more time to deploy. If you have plenty of time to set up shop in your favorite spot, then these tripods could be your best possible option. Aspects to Consider Before Buying There are some aspects you should consider while you’re looking for a good shooting stick to call your own. One or two of these might be the driving factor to your buying decision. It does take a bit of time and a little skill to distinguish a great shooting stick from one that is unreliable and poor in quality. Here are the aspects to consider: What Kind of Shooting Stick Do I Need? Are you planning on moving around a lot? Will you be staying in one place the entire day? Your choice will probably depend on how you answer both of these questions. If you’re looking to move from place to place during a hunt, then you’ll need a monopod to get the job done. A bipod can be sufficient if you can handle the slight extra weight and slightly longer deployment time. However, if you plan on staying in one place the entire day, you may want to consider a tripod as your best possible option. Bog-pod Shooting Sticks Price If you’re a budget shopper, you’re always going to place the price tag at a higher importance. But don’t let it be the sole reason why you chose to purchase a specific model. It’s important to find the best shooting stick that is excellent in quality and will function the way you want it to. Don’t settle for a low price tag, as this will set you up with a device that will likely fail you time and time again. What to Look for in a High-Quality Shooting Stick? Quality should be the most important aspect of any item. You want something that will last you in the long-term. To find the right shooting stick, you need one that is made from high-quality materials like aluminum or steel. These two materials are proven to be strong and have the ability to take on all kinds of abuse. At the same time, they have also proven to be sturdier. The sturdier they are, the better chance they have of standing in almost any conditions. Quick Take - The Best Shooting Sticks These are our recommendations for the best shooting sticks: Bog-pod Shooting Sticks Vanguard Scout B62 Shooting Stick Caldwell Adjustable Ambidextrous Rifle Shooting Rest Review of the " "Best Shooting Stick" s" The following is a list of the six best shooting sticks currently on the market. As you look through each one, it is important to find one that will match your personal needs and preferences. That’s when you need to pay close attention to the features and functions of the shooting stick itself. If it matches up with what you’re actually looking for, you’re bound to find a winner. With that in mind, let’s take a look at the best overall choices currently on the market: Best Overall: Bog-Pod Shooting Sticks CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent for Hunters No Slippage to Report Thanks to the Rubber Footings Easy Horizontal Corrections Thanks to the 360-Degree Swivel Super Sturdy Construction, Can Stand Up to Any Weather Conditions Provides Excellent Stability Whether Seated or in Prone Position Cons May Not Be Suitable for a Standing Position Folding and Unfolding Can Get a Little Stiff at First Placement on Rough Terrain Might Be Difficult What Recent Buyers Report Buyers have been able to get excellent stability from this bipod. Some of them were bench shooters , so they were able to easily adjust the height for ease of shooting. Others were able to get better stability just by shooting in the prone position. Regardless, the shooting accuracy was precise and consistent. Why it Stands Out to Us The construction is solid and the product definitely has the ability to hold up on even the roughest terrains. Even on ice, it can still hold up quite well. So the gripping ability on the rubber feet might be hard to match when competing with other shooting sticks. Who Will Use This Most This will be used by bench shooters and prone position shooters, especially those who are avid hunters and target shooters. The major reasons: better stability and better accuracy. Obviously, the two go hand in hand. Accuracy always matters in these applications because it leads to better kill shots or tighter groups near the bullseye. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that might warrant an improvement is making the folding/unfolding more fluid and easy. Kind of like adding WD-40 to a creaky hinge. At the outset, it might be a little rough to deploy from the start, but it can save you a lot of time and frustration if you make it a little smoother. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a shooting stick that is considered to be the best of the best, the Bog Pod might just be something that is right up your alley. It’s solid, rugged, and definitely will hold its own with most types of terrain. Runner-Up: Vanguard Scout B62 Shooting Stick CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent for Hunting Applications Easy to Deploy, Takes a Few Seconds Lightweight and Very Easy to Carry Around Compact and Portable, Won’t Take Up Too Much Room Easily Adjustable to Any Height for Prone, Sitting, or Even Standing Positions Cons May Slip in Some Terrain Conditions Adjustments May Be Stiff for Some Users It Might Get a Little Noisy When Unfolding the Legs What "Recent Buyers Report" One recent buyer used this for his latest hunt. He was able to keep it stable in a standing position for a long time. The pointed feet at the bottom are used to make sure you can plant it deep enough into the ground so you can keep it steady while standing. You can also adjust it for all kinds of positions like making it shorter for bench shooting. Why it Stands Out to Us The construction is sturdy and the adjustments seem almost limitless. Plus, deployment is quick and painless. This is probably the best description of how a shooting stick should work. If these are features you’re looking for, there’s a good chance you’ll find this model appealing. Who Will "Use This Most" Hunters will likely use this to their advantage, especially if they are shooting from either a prone or seated position. The standing position might only be used for target shooters unless hunters are able to find just enough cover to the point where they can stand. Being stealthy and out of the sight of your target is important. If you’re unable to find a place where you can remain standing during a hunt, you’re better off either prone or sitting. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that might improve the bipod is to make it a little sturdier for some of the heavy-hitting rifles. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a bipod that’s easy to adjust and can be deployed as quickly as possible in any application, you’ll want to consider looking at the Vanguard Shooting Stick a little further. Whether you’re hunting or just shooting at targets at the range, this product could definitely be your long-term solution for accurate and more stable shooting. Best for the Money: Caldwell Adjustable Ambidextrous Rifle Shooting Rest CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Great for Long-Range Rifles Excellent for Big Game Hunters Light in Weight, Which Makes Portability a Lot Easier Makes Zeroing-in and Position Shooting Much Easier Very Compact, Easy to Store Away, and Doesn’t Take Up Much Room Cons Some Have Reported That the Stability Might Be Suspect Some Have Complained That the Legs Don’t Come Out Farther The Lack of a Sling Might Make it Difficult to Carry Around for Long Periods of Time What Recent Buyers Report Most recent buyers were aware of this being one of the more affordable models on the market. It ended up being a lot more than what they paid for in terms of quality and performance. They were able to attach their rifles with ease and fire off accurate shots with more stability. They were also pleasantly surprised that it was lightweight and portable for a tripod. Why it Stands Out to Us This tripod design is not as heavy or slow to deploy like many regular models. At the same time, it’s sturdy and stable, so you can deploy this on pretty much any kind of terrain and it will stay in place. You won’t have to worry about it getting knocked down or slipping out of place. Who Will Use This Most This will likely be used by big game hunters and competitive shooters. The main reason is that a tripod is a lot more solid in construction and more stable overall. This will make shooting a lot better. Your shots will be perfectly aligned and have even better accuracy compared to just holding it in your hands. This is also a good tool to have if you’re looking for something to give you a better chance at sighting-in your rifle. What Could be Improved and Why Simple: add a sling swivel to it. Or any sling, in particular. This will allow hunters who tend to hike longer distances to carry it without the discomfort or struggle of carrying other things that they might need. Besides, you need your hands for other uses (like looking through binoculars or using a sidearm if such a situation were to arise). Bottom Line If you’re looking for a shooting stick that is cheap, flimsy, and low-quality, you’ll be sorely disappointed. The Caldwell Deadshot is a sturdy tripod that is well worth the money you pay. If you’re looking for a shooting stick you can rely on without breaking the bank, consider the Deadshot a possible finalist on your shortlist of choices. Best Monopod Shooting Stick: Hammers Shooting Stick CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Extremely Sturdy Construction Can Also Be Used as a Hiking Stick Very Lightweight and Easily Portable Excellent for Hunting and Target Shooting V-Mount Provides Great Stability for Rifles and Pistols Cons Rubber Footing Tends to Come Loose May Not Fit in Small or Medium-Sized Backpacks Some Were Not Satisfied With it Being Made in China (Cheap Quality) What Recent Buyers Report Most recent buyers saw this as a multi-purpose tool. One, it can be used as a pretty sturdy hiking stick that will get you around, even on some pretty rough terrain. It can also be used as a handy shooting stick whenever you need it. One recent buyer said that it’s a must-have for hunters. Why it Stands Out to Us This monopod is no ordinary shooting stick. In fact, you don’t even have to use it as one. As it can be used as a hiking stick, you’ll definitely have one that is solid and reliable, especially if you’re suffering from mobility issues as you age. This would make the perfect hunting companion for older hunters who can still shoot straight but can’t get around all that well anymore. Who Will Use This Most This monopod is used for outdoor purposes only. So expect this to be a hunter’s best choice for shooting sticks. This might be also used as a hiking stick or as a pod you can use to take pictures with. In short, this is a Swiss Army knife kind of pod that was originally designed for shooting. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that could be improved is to make the compass a little larger, especially for the potential of having older people use it. Their eyesight may not be as good to see the small lettering on the compass itself. So, make it bigger so they can see it better and prevent the likelihood of going in the wrong direction. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a monopod that is designed to be the ultimate outdoor tool, the Hammers Shooting Stick might be exactly what you’re looking for. Even if you don’t use it for shooting, it’s a sturdy unit that you can use for other purposes like hiking or taking pictures in the great outdoors. Best Bipod Stick: Caldwell XLA Fixed Sling Stud Bipod with Fast Expand Legs CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Affordable for Most Budgets Very Sturdy and Stable With No Slippage to Report Excellent for Hunting Varmints, Coyotes, and Big Game Folds Up Nicely Without Any Issues, Which Makes for Easy Storage Perfectly Sized for All Kinds of Shooters (Short-Statured, Big and Tall, etc.) Cons Pivot Feature is a Little Looser Than Expected May Not Stay Attached With Most Rifles (i.e.--.308 Caliber Rifles) Some Have Concerns About it Being Too Lightweight and Might Break While Handling Some Rifles What Recent Buyers Report Most recent buyers loved seeing this bipod deploy a lot quicker than most on the market. Other than that, they reported that the shooting stick is indeed quite sturdy when adjusted to other heights. For prone position shooters, it made their shooting much more accurate than without the stick itself. Why it Stands Out to Us This bipod is so lightweight, you can carry it around all day without ever worrying about being uncomfortable. However, that doesn’t mean you should forego the idea of getting a sling for it if you plan on taking long walks during your hunting trip. This bipod has a great range of adjustable heights that are suitable for standing, sitting, and prone position shooting. Who Will Use This Most This will most likely be used by hunters and target shooters. For the latter application, this will probably be also used for competition shooting as well. It’s lightweight enough to take on the heat of the competition, especially when every shot has to count. This will give you the stability and accuracy you need to get an edge on your rivals. What Could be Improved and Why One thing that we think can be improved is getting rid of the pivot feature. It should just be a pod where you can allow it to be straight and perfectly aligned for any target that might stand in the way. Plus, you’ll know when to pull the trigger once your target reaches the line of fire. Bottom Line If you’re looking for the best bipod stick on the market, you might find the Caldwell Bipod as one of your best possible options. If you’re more of a hunter than a target shooter, this could also be your best friend out in the field. Your hit probability might just go up if you go with this bipod. Best Tripod Stick: "Primos Hunting Trigger" Stick Gen 3 Short Tripod CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to Fold and Unfold Rapid Deployment Very Lightweight and Portable Excellent for Hog, Coyote, and Deer Hunting Rotating Joint is Not Loose and Allows for Very Smooth Panning Cons Might Not be Stable on Some Rough Terrains Might Be a Little Too Long for Backpack Storage Some Say it Might Be a Little Bulkier Than Expected What Recent Buyers Report Recent buyers were quick to say that the stability on this tripod was really good. Some say that it stayed in place even in windy conditions. The time to deploy wasn't very long. It took as little as ten seconds to fully deploy the pod itself. As for attaching your rifles, it was easy attach and detach. Why it Stands Out to Us This tripod is probably the best in its class for being more lightweight and easier to deploy. At the same time, the construction is solid, as expected. Other than the construction and some of its functionality, it sticks out as a must-have shooting sticks that a bench shooter could ever dream about. Who Will Use This Most While it will likely be used by your typical standing or prone position shooters, there’s a good chance that bench shooters will seize the opportunity by getting this tripod. The height adjustments on the lower end are just enough for you to shoot comfortably from a sitting position. Either way, you still get some pretty good stability from the pod itself. What Could be Improved and Why One of the things that could be improved is to add stakes to the feet of the tripod. This way, it will allow the tripod itself to plant itself a little further to the ground. That alone can make the stability a little better, especially while you’re dealing with rough but soft terrain. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a tripod that will give you the best in stability and make shooting a lot better for most applications,  the Primos Hunting Trigger Shooting Stick could be your best investment yet. This has its uses no matter which position you are comfortable shooting from. Even for a tripod, it has a hard to rival the ability to deploy much faster than any other tripod on the market. How to Use a Shooting Stick If you haven’t used a shooting stick before, you’re not alone. Once you have one you can learn how to use it just by reading this brief guide. Here’s what you need to do: If you’re using a monopod, place it at a 45-degree angle and then place the rifle on top of it. Placing it straight up will cause stability issues and it will wobble around. Not only will your shots miss the mark, but it can put you in a potentially dangerous situation. Conclusion Once you find the best shooting stick that fulfills your needs, you’ll be excited to put it to good use. As always, you should consider giving it a test drive at the range or in a gravel pit so you can make sure that it’s ready for primetime. Once you know it’s stable enough, it’s ready for any application you set your mind to.

The Ubiquitous 30-30 Lever Gun

Dear survivalists and preppers, have we gone AR and AK nuts? Hey, you know what, there are viable alternatives to the multi-round, mag latch, muzzle flash black guns so often associated with the bug out movement. For one, this author contends a good ole reliable, lever action 30-30 has a role to play in our survivalist work. Sometimes the best choice is the most iconic one. If you’re into such things, you can revisit the original lever action rifle developed in 1894.  The Henry “load once, shoot all day” rifles, among other efforts, pre-date the early Winchesters that ‘ won the American west ‘. The 30-30 came a year later as the first American centerfire smokeless powder load. Even today, the so-called aged 30-30 Winchester remains the benchmark deer hunting cartridge mainly because it delivers ample killing power at reasonable ranges. Still widely available in factory ammo loads using 150-170 grain bullets, the 30-30 is no magnum, but is still effective. Quick Navigation The Outfit that Fits The Lever Gun Market Distractors? The Outfit that Fits A lever action 30-30 rifle is a versatile bug out rifle for woods, field, or ranch. It can be used for protection, patrol, varmint control, and hunting. These rifles are generally lightweight, handy to wield, and easy to shoot with low recoil. It is just as useful for protecting the bug in residence. The common variety 30-30 lever gun offers a 20-inch tube with some models sporting carbine, or compact rifled barrels. The under-barrel magazine tube holds 5-6 rounds with one additional loaded in the chamber. Sure, not a mag change, but cartridges are easily inserted into the side action loading gate. Lever action cycling is fast, effective, and accurate. What’s more, the lever action rifle is a reliable, well-tested choice. The lever gun is a good alternative fit for many preppers. Related: Ruger Charger Takedown Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA As promoted, the typical lever action rifle is a handy tool. It is straight-forward in its use with no complicated buttons, switches, releases or other distractions. This rifle format is easy to load, operate, and chamber. The lever action is a positive camming action that rarely fails to work. Normally, the external hammer is positioned in a half-cock safe position prior to fully cocking the hammer for firing. Many of today’s new factory lever guns also offer a slide bolt safety lock that is simple to manipulate. First time and experienced shooters will find the lever gun easy to operate. The mechanism becomes second nature. Barrel lengths of lever guns vary from short carbine lengths of 16-inches to the factory standard barrel of 20-inches. There are some models that have longer tubes and some with intermediate barrel lengths. Shop for what you can handle best. Lever guns most often come supplied with factory installed open sights, usually a simple buckhorn adjustable sight dovetailed into the barrel. The forward front sight can be a simple ramp or hooded ramp to reduce glare. Most current production lever guns have the upper receiver drilled and tapped for installing a scope mount for an optical riflescope. Lever guns weigh in the neighborhood of 6-7 pounds, loaded. Many models have sling swivel studs to install a shoulder sling for ease of carry or for shooting support. They are not cumbersome to tote and can be pressed into service quickly and smoothly onto a distant target. A sling can be carried across the chest to free up both hands for other tasks, yet the rifle can be rolled out of the carry mode and easily shouldered for shooting. Lever guns usually come with wood stocks but newer versions are now offering black synthetic buttstocks and forearms. Rifle finishes vary from a standard blued metal, matte finishes, or stainless steel models. Select the features that suit your needs and applications best. The Lever Gun Market Lever action rifle models are currently available from Winchester, Marlin, Rossi, Mossberg, and Henry Repeating Arms. These manufacturer’s offer models in 30-30, smaller handgun equivalent loads, and heavier loads like the 45-70 . The 30-30 remains the moderate alternative. See Also: The Theory and Practical Application of The Walking Around Rifle A new lever action rifle is going to set you back from $450 to upwards of $600, maybe slightly more. They are certainly cheaper than most AR rifles. Sales on lever guns can be found and shopped. Gun shows will have new and used rifles. If you go the used route, just be certain you are confident the rifle is in excellent condition. Stay clear of rifles with rust or an abusive appearance. You’ll know an overused gun when you see it. Distractors? To be honest, the typical lever action 30-30 rifle is no AR-15. But, let’s not get lost comparing apples to oranges. The obvious distractor could be the loaded ammunition capacity. However, load up the magazine, put one extra in the chamber and use a buttstock ammo holder to carry six more rounds on the rifle. That is plenty of ammo for hunting and deterring threats. Put twenty more rounds on belt loops or in an easy access pouch on your carry backpack. It sure beats lugging along a half dozen AR mags in a heavy, hot front carry vest. ARs definitely have their places, but not all the time. Preppers should always be open to alternatives; adopt them and adapt to them.  Is the 30-30 lever action rifle an ideal set up? Well, no. It probably isn’t ideal for every bug-out or bug-in application. But, it is another choice worthy of serious consideration. Easy to operate, carry, deploy, shoot, and maintain, the 30-30 lever gun has a lot going for it. Photos Courtesy of: John Woods Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: 1887 T-Model 12 Gauge Shotgun Ruger 10/22 Takedown: Survival Rifle Review Henry .410 Lever Action Shotgun: Survival Shotgun Review for 2020 Upgrade Your Survival 10/22 for $100 with TANDEMKROSS

How to Build an AR-15 Lower Receiver: Trigger Guard

For those of you following the How to Build an AR-15 series (thus far, we’ve just finished installing the magazine catch ), this article will cover installing the trigger guard. For visual reference for this part of the AR build, check out this video . I’ve included the time stamp for the segment of the video associated with this article. I will be explaining how to complete this step with a block of wood, roll pin punches , and a hammer. But recently, I discovered the Roll Pin Pusher (R.P.P.) tool, which I’ll cover in more detail a later post . (04:20) Step 2 – Trigger guard Use the piece of wood to support the lower receiver trigger guard ears or you will risk breaking one off. PLEASE NOTE: It is extremely important that you maintain proper support to the “dog ear” tabs during this step. If you do not, you will risk breaking one of these tabs on your lower receiver. Yeah, not fun. Remove your lower receiver from the vise block and place it on a hard, flat surface. Take your piece of wood and place it under the bottom “dog ear” trigger guard tab. Now place your trigger guard in between the tabs where it would be once it is installed. Using a small hammer and the properly sized roll pin starter, tap the trigger guard roll pin into the first tab and partially into the trigger guard, hence holding it in place. Using a 1/8″ roll pin punch , while supporting the bottom tab with the piece of wood, continue to drive the trigger guard roll pin into the trigger guard until it is flush on both sides of your AR-15 lower receiver. I know you were careful, but did you break a tab off? Don’t panic too much. Just pick up one of these pistol grips and you will be back in action. Our build is starting to shape up, isn’t it? Keep your eye out for the article on our next step: installing the bolt catch .

Summary

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